Logo

We support NOCC

Two Sisters New Beginnings, LLC

 

 

Repurposed Furniture

Our little store provides a venue for offering a very special kind of product – repurposed furniture. Many are unfamiliar with this terminology. We all come across furniture that has, for practical purposes, reached the end of its useful life. Sometimes we even see these pieces on the trash pile. Fortunately, there is often a process to provide a new life for these pieces. This is not recycling. Typically, recycling would involve destruction of the piece and salvaging its materials and components for other uses. This is also not restoration, which would involve bringing the piece back to its original state. In most cases, the piece will be drastically changed without destroying its core form.

A piece of furniture that is being repurposed may need to be repaired. The cushions of a chair may be torn, worn, or even missing. The drawer in a desk or chest may be broken or deteriorated with age. These flaws require repair before any other steps. Following repairs to make certain a piece is sturdy, safe, and sound, almost all furniture intended for repurposing needs a new finish. Here is where our creativity really gets into play. Much of our repurposed furniture is finished with chalk paint, a relatively new finishing system that creates a beautiful finished product of even hard-worn, stained, or abused natural wood or painted finishes.

Chalk painting involves typical surface preparation to remove dirt, grease, and finish failures. Then, the piece is painted with a special chalk paint selected for its ready coverage, durability, and exciting colors. Finally, the piece is rubbed with several coats of a special wax that provides protection for the finished product against spills, stains, and everyday use. Click here to see more about Annie Sloan’s Chalk Painting System.

The repurposed piece is now ready for years of renewed service, often in a completely different setting and use. When you look at repurposed furniture in our store, be sure and ask about the history and process employed to bring the piece to its new life.